`

The Weekend Read: Nov 20

Singapore Fintech Festival

MAS MD Ravi Menon announces MAS-R3 Interbank Payments project at SGFintechFest

MAS MD Ravi Menon announces MAS-R3 Interbank Payments project at SGFintechFest

I asked Antony Lewis for a field report on this week's Singapore Fintech Festival:

11,000 sweaty people couldn’t be wrong…Singapore was the hottest place for FinTech this week, as the world’s first regulator-managed FinTech event kicked off for a week-long collab confab.  Ravi Menon, the MD of the Monetary Authority of Singapore, opened the festival by announcing R3’s collaborative efforts with 10 banks and partners to put the Singapore Dollar on a distributed ledger. (see BBG article here). This garnered quite a bit of inbound interest from other parts of the globe as the week wore on, and we look forward to pursuing this piece of collaborative work in a "jurisdiction near you" soon.

Tim Grant insists that he didn’t pay off the Audio/Visual crew during his panel on Wednesday when Blythe Masters’ microphone didn’t work. The whole panel, including Oliver Bussmann (independent) and Sandra Ro (CME), generally agreed that we need to see some traction next year.  Tim’s “5 Ps” of DLT (Proof-of-Concept-->Prototype-->Pilot-->Permission-->Production) crashed Instagram as the audience became bewitched by the power of alliteration. ABC (AI, Blockchain, Cloud) grew a little more mature and became ABCD (AI, Big Data, Cloud, DLT). Our CEO, David Rutter, was also featured at the ASIFMA Annual Conference (all pics above).

The above, and the MAS’ partnership with R3 announced last week, all paves the way nicely for our Lab of Excellence in Singapore. Lattice80, the world’s largest FinTech co-working space, will be the perfect location to light up those Bunsen burners. If you would like to join us, we are hiring in Singapore.

RegTech and CBDC (cont.)

Continuing the MAS RegTech focus elsewhere, there continues to be a steady drumbeat of news stories concerning the regulator's role in fintech and DLT. First up is the U.S. SEC and CoinDesk's profile of the SEC DLT lead Valerie Szczepanik. The article reviews the SEC working group's focus to date, as well as raising the topic of regulation and ICOs:

Since an ethereum startup called The DAO raised over $100m by selling digital tokens without an exchange, a rush of companies have followed suit. So-called initial coin offerings can be launched from anywhere in the world and cross borders as easily as the Internet itself. With millions of dollars worth of capital raised so far and dozens of ICOs in the works, how the SEC will handle the technology is one of the biggest areas of regulatory uncertainty in the industry. Regardless of whether Gemini and SolidX ever win approval or if ICOs might displace traditional fundraising, the SEC will likely play a role.

Speaking of The DAO, the team behind the dream/nightmare, Slock.it, are back with another project, pushing the "fail fast, fail upwards" concept to its limits. I happened to see this being compared to the advent of flight and aviation inventors, yet the comparison falls flat (like many early aviators (groan)) as these innovators fail the "skin in the game" test popularized by Nassim Taleb. As far as I can tell, there was no repercussion from the absolute failure that was The DAO, whereas those early aviators had the ultimate skin in the game! (For more on that story, check out David McCullough's excellent book on The Wright Brothers).

Sweden's Riksbank made headlines this week with talk of issuing digital currency:

The so-called e-krona may be introduced within two years. “The less those of us living in Sweden use bank notes and coins, the clearer it becomes that the Riksbank needs to investigate whether we should issue electronic money as a complement to the money we have today,” Riksbank Deputy Governor Cecilia Skingsley told the Financial Times.
Sweden's Riksbank is the world’s oldest central bank, and was the first to issue paper banknotes in the 1660s.

Central Bank Digital Currency (CBDC) remains an area of focus for R3 and our Research team. For R3 members, please reach out to us if you have seen our recently published private reports on this topic.

India has also made headlines with their recent demonetization scheme. Once again, many armchair economists/sociologists on the Twitter have been giving their "two paise" on the subject, but since I at least admit total ignorance to all the nuance, here instead is what looks to be a great run down of the issue at hand by The Diplomat.

Bonus link: no idea where to put this but here is CoinDesk's summary of their recently released State of Blockchain.

R3's Second Smart Contract Templates Summit & RGB on Corda

We were very pleased to host the second summit dedicated to all things smart contract, with participants in person in Barclays London and New York, with many more across the globe dialed in (Ed. note: need to clarify how time is measured by organizers of upcoming event billing itself as "The Industry's First Event Exclusively Dedicated to Smart Contracts"...). Dr. Lee Braine of Barclays once again set a high standard for the proposed agenda, and all the contributors managed to outdo themselves. IB Times has a great rundown of the event, and we have provided all of the presentation materials via this link. Allow myself to quote...myself:

The summit featured presentations by Barclays, CIBC, Nordea Markets, ISDA, FIA, Norton Rose Fulbright, Thomson Reuters, University College London, Cardozo Law School, and R3. Todd McDonald, co-founder of R3, said: "We wanted to hold this second summit to keep up the cadence and to continue what we at R3 and all the participants feel is important: progressing this in the open and it being industry led, rather than by just one organisation or one company."

Our CTO Richard Gendal Brown was featured on two 11FS podcasts this week. First up, RGB was joined by Richard Crook (Head of Innovation Engineering, RBS) and Ajit Tripathy (Fintech and Digital Director, PWC) for a more wide ranging chat. The second is a video link to a 1-on-1 chat with Richard Brown. Both pieces were moderated by our old friend Simon Taylor, aka The Blockchain Beard (who evidently put his size smedium t shirts on a high-heat drying cycle in order to show of his Blockchain Biceps in the attached video...). Richard as always delivers an extremely lucid explanation of not only the functionality but more importantly the benefit of DLT, and specifically Corda, to financial institutions:

On why anyone should care about blockchain and DLT: It just becomes self-evident that there’s a massive opportunity in finance, wherever firms record the same data that their counterparts do, and then have to manage it, that this blockchain technology…can be used to massively simplify and reduce that cost and complexity by just doing it once and knowing for sure that what you see is what your counterpart sees.
On how is Corda different from traditional blockchains: The short answer to your question…it is designed by and for financial institutions, its focus is not on crypto-currency or virtual machines; its focus is managing legal agreements between regulated institutions, is designed to integrate and inter-operate with existing systems in banks, and is designed to integrate well with the legal system…. So this isn’t the idea of computers running amok and controlling the world. This is computer code. This is computer data that, in the event of dispute, is grounded firmly in legal reality.